Local tradition

 Local tradition

expect local traditions, customs, values, and sentiments to help them protect local culture and maintain local pride

A: Respect privacy when taking photographs B: Respect holy places C: Refrain from giving money to children as it encourages begging D: Respect for the local etiquette earns you respect E: Let the Himalayas change you – Do not change them F: Protect the natural environment G: Leave the campsite cleaner than you found it H: Limit deforestation – make no open fires I: Burn dry paper and packets in a safe place J: Keep local water clean and avoid using pollutants K: Plants should be left to flourish in their natural environment

Legends state that dances in this country originated in the abode of Lord Shiva — the Himalayas, where he performed the Tandave dance.[2] This indicates that the dance traditions of Nepal are very ancient and unique. With altitudes and ethnicity, the dances of Nepal slightly change in style as well as in the costumes. The Mishka, a dance performed at weddings, includes intricate footwork and arm movements.[3] Accompanying music and musical instruments change in tune with the themes, which revolve around topics like harvesting of crops, marriage rites, war stories, a lonely girl’s yearning for her lover, and several other themes and stories from everyday life in the villages. The famous Tharu stick dances and the crazy peacock dance are two highlights, but there are plenty of other surprises. Expect to be invited to join in the dancing, as the evening reaches its climax.[4]

Local tradition

Hindu and Buddhist traditions in Nepal go back more than two millennia. In Lumbini, Buddha was born, and Pashupatinath temple, Kathmandu, is an old and famous Shiva temple of Hindus. Nepal has several other temples and Buddhist monasteries, as well as places of worship of other religious groups. Traditionally, Nepalese philosophical thoughts are ingrained with the Hindu and Buddhist philosophical ethos and traditions, which include elements of Kashmir Shaivism, Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism, works of Karmacharyas of Bhaktapur, and tantric traditions. Tantric traditions are deep-rooted in Nepal, including the practice of animal sacrifices. Five types of animals, always male, are considered acceptable for sacrifice: water buffalo, goats, sheep, chickens, and ducks. Cows are very sacred animals and are never considered acceptable for sacrifice.